Community stories and news

  • Accessible information in an isolated time

    Community news

    Podcast on accessible information during COVID-19 and the challenges that come with isolation. Both Molly (web accessibility consultant) and Rebecca (psychotherapist) live with Usher syndrome, a condition causing combined blindness and deafness.

    ProQR talks episode 1
  • Towards a therapy for one patient

    Community news

    It has been roughly two years since David Rodman became the Executive Vice-President Research & Development at ProQR to apply his knowledge of study design and genetic diseases on our pipeline for genetic eye diseases.

    Photo of David Rodman
  • We push for the best research, so that patients benefit the most

    Community news

    The work at ProQR would not be possible without the help from patient organizations and foundations. One of the main supporters is the Foundation Fighting Blindness, who generously provided funding for the clinical development of QR-421a.

    A photo of Stephen Rose
  • I want my daughter to be able to dream, and keep dreaming

    Community news

    At a glance, it’s hard to tell Maartje - mother of four - has Usher syndrome. Though she manages her life very well, it took her a long time to get to that point. “I have learned to be optimistic, but the somberness is always there."

    Photo of Maartje
  • Breaking barriers to better therapies

    Community news

    New therapies are thoroughly tested to ensure safety and efficacy, but for a company like ProQR, which aims to treat small groups of patients with rare diseases, innovating within the system is essential. Jessica is trying to rethink clinical trials.

    Photo of Jessica Ibbitson
  • Navigating an improvement in vision

    Community news

    ProQR has a promising pipeline in ophthalmology programs that is built on RNA technology. According to Dr. Peter Adamson, ProQR’s (former) Senior Vice President Ophthalmology Franchise, RNA may reach the ultimate goal: to make blind people see again.

    Photo of Dr. Peter Adamson
  • “Putting knowledge based creativity to work”

    Community news

    Interview with Dr. Ted Dryja, Scientific Advisory Board member. The pioneer in inherited retinal diseases joined ProQR to help push the organization forward. “I'm excited about what RNA technology may do for ProQR’s ophthalmology pipeline."

    Photo of Dr. Ted Dryja
  • Welcome to the happy world of Beatrice

    Community news

    When watching Cristian, Silvia and Edoardo (age 6) and Beatrice (age 2) they look like the ideal, happy family. When asked, the parents insist they are, in many ways. The fact that Beatrice has Leber congenital amaurosis, doesn't change that.

    A photo of Cristian, Silvia and their kids Edoardo and Beatrice. Beatrice has Lber congenital amaurosis 10
  • “A new way of designing medicines”

    Community news

    Bart Klein was at the forefront of ProQR's Axiomer® RNA editing technology development. This platform technology makes it possible to use the cells own machinery to reverse mutations that cause a genetic disease. Read the interview.

    A photo of Bart Klein
  • “Top-notch science that leads to a treatment”

    Community news

    2017 may become a very exciting year for Patricia Biasutto, sepofarsen captain. Her work, developing a novel RNA therapy for Leber congenital amaurosis 10, has progressed steadily. The team expects to start a first clinical trial this year.

    A photo of Patricia Biasutto